From non-cyclist to bike owner via CityCycle – a 2 year journey.


 

00001. Numero Uno of CityCycles

Take one non-cyclist.

Add one much maligned bike share program.

Include a healthy dose of passive aggressiveness.

That’s me.

Even before CityCycle  started, I was sold. The more people dismissed it, the more I wanted to do it, to prove them wrong.

What did I know about cycling though?

I believe the technical term is: Jack.

I hadn’t cycled as part of commuting since high school (a very nasty fall due to some road works saw me keep off a bike for many, many years). I did spend a few hours on a bike on a holiday overseas a few years back, but riding in Brisbane? Forget it. Everyone knows just how dangerous it is!

Yet here I was. Committed to CityCycle to prove to people that you could use it as part of your day.

That I did.

I battled through the roll outs and the station that still hasn’t opened close to my home… I pushed through and ended up selling my car, because I rode everywhere. When I went out of the CityCycle network, well there is Translink for that. When I really needed a car, I just hired one. I would CityCycle to and from the rental agency. Too easy and oh so much cheaper than owning.

Weekend on the Coast? Don't forget the bike!

Living and working in the inner city meant that I could get away with not needing a car, with jumping on a CityCycle and getting to where I wanted to go. Free helmets saw me use the bikes even more – because on the odd occasions I didn’t have my helmet with me, I could jump on one and just ride. I mean why walk 10 minutes when you can ride it in 2? Need to get to a meeting (or a coffee) a few blocks away? Jump a CityCycle. It is just so easy.

Over the course of 2 years, I went from pavement and bike path only riding, to being a confident (and law abiding) road based cyclist.

CityCycle did exactly what it is purported to do, for me at least. It got me out of the car, saw me opt out of much public transport (or at least incorporate it for shorter distances), increased my cycling confidence, improved my fitness, and transition into a bike owner.

A few months ago, I took on a new role, located way outside the CityCycle network. When I looked at the job and the location, I didn’t worry about parking, I checked public transport (as a back up) and how it was for riding to and from work. This of course meant I would have to buy a bike. So my CityCycle journey was complete.

I currently ride to and from work daily. If it is a lovely day, I come home the long way along the river, to truly enjoy the city. I love my town and I love riding. I plan weekends around where I can cycle and explore. I have met a whole new group of people – cyclists! Who would have thought that a few years ago this would be me? I would have laughed at you for suggesting it.

 

Yep. That's me. The cyclist.

Yet here I am.

A cyclist.

Post Script:
I have been asked quite frequently since buying my bike if I will be keeping my CityCycle membership. You know what? I will be. I still think CityCycle is the best option for one way trips, or if I want to go somewhere I don’t feel confident about locking my bike up unattended for hours. For $60 a year, I truly believe it is best option out there for many people… you just have to commit to not only trying it, but sticking to it.

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One Response to “From non-cyclist to bike owner via CityCycle – a 2 year journey.”

  1. Taezar (@Taezar) (@Taezar) (@Taezar) Says:

    From non-cyclist to bike owner via #citycycle #brisbane http://t.co/M2T6cGaX via @howmanypandas

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